Feeding Tips to Prevent Sports Injuries

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Feeding Tips to Prevent Sports Injuries

Feeding Tips to Prevent Sports Injuries: The main injuries that occur in sports are fractures, sprains, tears and inflammations, either of bones, muscles or tendons. Therefore, from the feeding, we will have to take the necessary measures to prevent them.

Regularly and systematically performing a physical activity or sport has proven to be a very beneficial practice to maintain health and prevent diseases. Also, the discipline of maintaining a pace of training also exposes us to suffer some risks of physical injury.

An injury can mean a break in training, as well as possible future complications, a situation that worries any active athlete. Therefore, it is essential to know that eating habits and lifestyles are essential to ensure the prevention of possible injuries or even help to restore the evolution of an injury so that it does not become chronic.

How diet can help prevent injuries

The main injuries that occur with exercise and sports are fractures, sprains, tears and inflammations, either of bones, muscles or tendons. Therefore, from the feeding, we will have to take the necessary measures to try to maintain the bones, the muscles and the tendons in the best possible conditions.

Here are four specific food measures designed to meet the needs of sports practice and their training rates to reduce and prevent the risk of injury, as well as ensure adequate recovery, which will result in improved performance sports.

Feeding Tips Basic pillar hydration

The role of hydration is essential to avoid problems of thermoregulation, dehydration and muscle-tendon injuries. A well-hydrated muscle is more flexible and resistant, while a poorly hydrated muscle is more at risk of injury, contractures, and cramps. The same goes for tendons.

First, it is necessary to maintain good hydration throughout the day and not only at the time of training. We will do this through the usual intake of liquid (mineral water): it is advisable to take small sips of water frequently, avoiding the sensation of thirst, since this will be a symptom of dehydration.

Regarding hydration close to training or sporting event, keep in mind:

  1. Encourage hydration before, during and after sports activities by half a liter of drink 15 minutes before physical activity, half a liter more (depending on the duration of the session) during exercise, in small sips every 20 minutes, and another half a liter after the activity.

2. In hot environments (> 25ºC) it is necessary to drink a mineral salts drink (ensure that it has between 0,5-0,7g / L of sodium), this will help replenish the losses, not only of water but also of mineral salts (especially, sodium).

3. In activities longer than one hour, it is recommended that the isotonic drink contains sugars (a mixture of glucose, fructose, maltodextrins, etc.), in a concentration of 6-8%.

4. We must avoid drinking during moments of high respiratory frequency (hyperventilation) because we will be depriving our body of oxygen when it is most needed. Taking advantage of the decreases or sections of the diminished respiratory rate will favor the assimilation of liquid.

5.Replace 150% of the weight loss, weighing before and after exercise.

Make a good "Recovery

Feeding Tips Make a good “Recovery”

The glycogen reserves are exhausted at the hour and a half or two hours of intense exercise (according to personal adaptation) and these must be restored just at the end of the session. It has been shown that when carbohydrates and proteins of high biological value are ingested after finishing the exercise, the muscles are better loaded of glycogen whereas if it takes a couple of hours to eat they are only filled at 50%.

At the end of the exercise, athletes should get used to eating solid or liquid food that provides a high concentration of carbohydrates (minimum 1g / kg of weight) with a high glycemic index to awaken the insulin response and a lower contribution of proteins (0, 25 g / kg) to also initiate tissue repair. Currently, there are products formulated and intended for this purpose, but it should be remembered that the combination of conventional foods can also supply these energy needs.

Collagen and gelatin for joints, tendons, and muscle

Collagen and gelatin for joints, tendons, and muscle

The collagen is the most abundant protein in mammals and humans. It is the most important component of the skin, bones and connective tissues. It represents almost one-third of our total protein mass.

It is composed of non-essential amino acids (glycine, proline, and lysine) which mean that our body can produce its own collagen from other amino acids, but it has been seen that ensuring and contributing collagen through the diet is much more efficient to maintain well our structures and as we get older you lose effectiveness in obtaining them.

Being so close in most of our structures has numerous benefits in sports and health in general:

1.Reduces joint pain in athletes.

2.Strengthens tendons

3.It can improve the symptoms of arthritis.

4.Rejuvenates the skin

5.It helps to rest since glycine acts as a neurotransmitter inhibitor of the parasympathetic system.

There are two ways to increase your collagen intake: through food and supplementation. The ideal is always to prioritize the real food, but in specific cases and after professional assessment you can also contemplate the supplements.

To eat more collagen and incorporate it regularly in our diet we can:

Prepare broths of fish and animal bones.

Make gelatin desserts It must be pure gelatin, without flavor or sugar.

Include the skin of the animals (chicken, fish …) without being burned or fried, preventing it from being intensive production.

Feeding Tips Vitamin D and sports

Vitamin D and sports

The vitamin D is a fat-soluble prohormone that the body absorbs through daily diet, supplementation, and exposure of the skin to sunlight. It has a great impact on maintaining the effectiveness of the musculoskeletal system, mineralization, remodeling of the bones and the increase of muscle mass, strength and endurance. This is because it plays a role in the balance of calcium and phosphorus, maintaining and regulating its levels in the body; hence, it is highly recommended for athletes who carry weight regularly and need to strengthen their bone and muscle structure. On the other hand, it also has a preventive function of neurodegenerative, autoimmune and infectious diseases.

Due to these benefits, it is very important that athletes have an adequate intake, and make an adequate exposure to the sun to prevent deficit, which is very common especially in winter, with training after sunset or athletes who train in closed spaces.

Supplementation is the best solution to correct and solve the deficit. It is considered a safe dose for adults up to 4000 IU / day but should be adjusted according to individual needs. However, as a preventive measure, it will be important to provide foods rich in vitamin D and ensure daily sun exposure (15 minutes on face and arms are sufficient).

Dietary sources of vitamin D are:

1.Cod oil

2.Bluefish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel, herring, conger eel, shellfish (especially oysters)

3.Whole milk and cheeses

4.Yolk

5.Mushrooms like shiitake

6.Beef Liver

What you should know…

1.Correct hydration is essential to avoid problems of thermoregulation, dehydration and muscle-tendon injuries.

2. The glycogen reserves are exhausted at the hour and a half or two hours of intense exercise (according to personal adaptation) and these must be restored just at the end of the session. 3. It is advisable to ensure an optimal supply of collagen, the most important component of the skin, bones and connective tissues. The idea is to do it through diet, but it can also be supplemented, under the supervision of a specialist.

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